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Course Descriptions - Spring 2012

Instruction begins: Monday, April 2
Instruction ends: Thursday, June 7
Final exams: June 9, 11-14
Quarter ends: June 14
Academic Holidays: May 28

Click on the department name to visit the department Web site. Click on the professor's name to vist his/her Web site.

Applied Science

EAD 280C; Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion
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T-Th, 8-9:20
Professor Luhmann - 3 units
Prerequisite: EAD 234B (Applied Electromagnetics) or consent of instructor.
Lecture: 3 hours. Equilibrium plasma properties; single particle motion; fluid equations; waves and instabilities in a fluid plasma; plasma kinetic theory and transport coefficients; linear and nonlinear Vlasov theory; fluctuations, correlations and radiation; inertial and magnetic confinement systems in controlled fusion.

Civil & Environmental Engineering

ECI 280; Nonlinear Finite Elements for Elastic-Plastic Problems
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T-Th, 10-11:50
Professor Jeremic - 4 units
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Lecture: 4 hours. State of the art finite element methods and tools for elasticplastic problems, including computational techniques based on the finite element method and the theory of elastoplasticity.

Computer Science Engineering

ECS 252; Computer Networks
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T-Th, 10:30-11:50
Professor Ghosal - 4 units
Prerequisite: Courses ECS 152A (Computer Networks), ECS 152B (Computer Networks)
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 3 hours. Internet protocol based computer networks applications, transport, network layer protocols. High speed LAN technologies: Ethernet, Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM). Delay models in data networks: analysis of multiaccess techniques in polling, ring, random access networks. Multimedia applications requirements and design.

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

MAE 250C; Mechanical Performance of Materials
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T-Th, 12:10-2
Professor Hill - 4 units
Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in stress analysis and mechanical behavior of materials.
Lecture: 4 hours. Occurrence, mechanisms, and prediction of fatigue and fracture phenomenon. Use of stress and strain to predict crack initiation. Use of fracture mechanics to predict failure and crack propagation. Effects of stress concentration, manufacturing, load sequence, irregular loading, and multi-axial loading. Offered in alternate years.

MAE 298; Micro- and Nano-Flows
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MW, 2:10-4
Professor Delplanque - 4 units

MAE 300; MISC
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Professor - units